Posted on

SPLASH Podcast: A Lovable Family Film if You Overlook the Bestiality, Child Nudity & Voyeurism

riley roberts splash mermaid

Photo Above: Podcaster Riley Roberts gives her take on Splash. Photographer: Victoria Igloi.

Splash is a family film that began our modern-day fascination with mermaids, a film that made Tom Hanks and Daryl Hannah  bonafide movie stars, and began Hanks journey as American treasure. But, does the film live up to its legacy? In many ways, yes! It’s still a heartwarmer of a tale. But family friendly? Hmmm…maybe not.

On ’80s Movies: A Guide to What’s Wrong with Your Parents podcast, mother-daughter movie critics Tara McNamara (Gen X) and Riley Roberts (Gen Y) re-examine the film with a modern-day perspective and discuss how it turned the Disney princess trope on its fins, and yet, perpetuated the attitudes that successful men are pigs to women and that’s okay.

Please give a listen to Splash: A Lovable Disney Movie that Just Happens to Have Child Nudity, Bestiality, and a Sex Crime.* And, check out our other podcast episodes available on iTunes, Stitcher, and BlogTalkRadio. Also, please read our comprehensive behind the scenes guide to Splash here: https://80smovieguide.com/splash/

(*depending on what state or country you’re in).

daryl hannah tom hanks john candy eugene levy

Posted on

I FEEL PRETTY is the unofficial reboot of BIG

Amy Schumer’s I Feel Pretty is a lot of things: an extremely relatable physical comedy, a statement on what society has done to women’s body image, and a demonstration of the power of self-confidence. And, it’s an unofficial sequel to Big.

It’s about a woman who is self-conscious about what she perceives to be her lack of beauty in today’s world. After watching the Tom Hanks ‘80s classic Big on a rainy night, she goes to a fountain and makes a wish to be beautiful. The next day, she suffers a blow to the head and wakes up seeing herself as beautiful, even though she looks exactly the same. What transpires is a display of off the charts self-confidence; the audience witnesses how her life changes just because she believes she is gorgeous by society’s standards. (See my What the Flick?! review below:)

Of course, the messaging is totally different than in Big, which is a gentle nudge that kids shouldn’t be in such a hurry to grow up and adults should hold on to their childhood.

Big gets the official tip of the hat, but I Feel Pretty is also reminiscent of a broad comedy from 2001: Shallow Hall. In the Farrelly Brothers movie, Jack Black plays a pig who dates women only based on their appearance. Then, Tony Robbins (!) hypnotizes him into seeing women’s outer appearance as a reflection of their inner beauty – and falls in love with a 300-lb. woman. When Hal’s “vision” returns to normal, he realizes that it’s who we are that counts, not what we look like. So, similar but still, a very, very different message geared to men, where I Feel Pretty deals with what it’s like to be a woman.

More gender or ethnicity-flipping ‘80s reboots are on the way: Overboard, Splash, and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Of course, Ghostbusters set the trend.

Personally, I dislike the idea of remaking movies that are still relevant and a part of pop culture. However, by switching roles, it can freshen up an old property while paying homage to it – like the recent Jumanji redo. If it makes audiences interested in watching the classic, then, let’s celebrate it. What films would you like to see reimagined with some sort of role reversal?